6 ways to Optimise Your Marketing Stories to Increase Sales Conversions by 30% or more.

Anna Iveson Blog Banner (4) (1)

83% of consumers agree with this statement…

“Not all promos are bad.  We just want to filter out the obnoxious ones”.

In fact, 73% of consumers say they’d rather filter out bad promos than see no promos at all.  

So what does this mean for you?  Well, it means that if you write non-obnoxious promotions, your prospects will actually look forward to reading them. AND they’ll be far more likely to take your desired action.  

It’s why story-driven marketing can boost your average conversion rates by 30% or more.

Which is where storytelling comes in.  Because when we hear stories our brains release the pleasure hormone, dopamine.  It’s the same chemical hit you get when you scoff a family-size Dairy Milk, gorge on an entire lump of cheese, or lie down for a soothing massage.

But do all stories take your readers from pleasure to purchase?  And what can you do to make sure your dopamine-inducing tale compels your prospects to take action?

Check out this video for 6 ways to Optimise Your Marketing Stories to Increase Sales Conversions by 30% or more.    

Beat Email Writer's Block For Good

Get access to all my secrets: I’m sharing EVERYTHING with you in this FREE 20-Page Actionable E-Book.

  • Follow the exact system I use, so I NEVER run out of compelling stories to share with my list. 
  • Learn how to choose precisely the right stories to move your subscribers to open, click and buy from your emails 
  • Build a unique email story framework for instant story inspiration whenever you want to send an email

Video Transcript:

Hey Anna here.

So this stat might surprise you. 83% of consumers agree with this statement – “Not all promos are bad, we just want to filter out the obnoxious ones.” In fact 73 % of consumers say they’d rather filter out bad promos than see no promos at all.

So what does this mean for you and your business?

Well, it basically means that if you can write non obnoxious promotions your prospects will actually look forward to hearing from you, and they’ll be far more likely to take your desired action. It’s why story driven marketing can boost your average conversion rates by 30% or more, because when we hear stories our brains release the pleasure hormone dopamine, which is the same chemical hit you get when you scoff a family-size Dairy Milk, gorge on an entire lump of cheddar or you lie down for a nice soothing massage.

But do all stories take your readers from pleasure to purchase?

What can you do to make sure your dopamine inducing tale compels your prospects to take action?

Check out the rest of this video for six ways to optimise your marketing stories to increase sales conversions by 30% or more.

Often when I speak to my clients, they’ll ask me if stories always convert. There are a couple of circumstances when stories don’t work.

The first one is, that you use a story at the wrong time. What I mean by this, is that when you’re telling a story or when you’re marketing your product and services, your customers are going to sit somewhere along this awareness scale (which I’m showing you right now) from most unaware – this is where your customers know they have a niggle but they’re not quite sure about the specifics of their problem. Then they move to the opposite end of the spectrum where they’re most aware, they know you, they know your product, they know they want your product but they just want to know what the deal is, in order to buy. So your customer is going to be encountering your marketing from somewhere along this awareness scale. They’re going to be – most unaware, problem aware, solution aware, product aware or most aware and depending where they sit on this scale when you’re sending out a marketing message, is going to determine whether you want to tell them a story message or a direct message. On the most aware end of the scale, a story isn’t really necessary because your customer is already ready to buy, all they want to know is where do I go to buy and how much. This is where a direct message is most appropriate and you don’t need to kind of beat around the bush or conceal your message because the customer is already willing to buy. They’re quite happy for you to pitch them and for you to give them the sale.

On the more unaware end of the scale, so this is people who don’t yet know exactly what their problem is, or they know they have a problem, but they’re not sure what the solution is, or they know that there’s a solution but they’re not sure about your solution – this is where you need a more indirect message because you’re going to have to educate your audience about why it’s your product they want to buy. This is where storytelling comes in because often customers don’t want to be sold to, so a story is a way of almost Trojan horsing your sales message. You’re going in under the radar by engaging their emotions in the form of an interesting and compelling story and that’s going to draw them into your message and allow you to introduce the sale at a point where their resistance is lower and they’re maybe not quite expecting you to pitch them a product or service. It’s a much more indirect and softer way to sell and to lead them to the point where they’re at the most aware end of the spectrum and they’re ready to buy from you.

The next situation where a story won’t convert, is if you choose a story that isn’t relevant to your prospects pain point. Often when people are telling stories in their marketing, they think that it’s okay to tell a story about pretty much anything – but actually your story isn’t about you just telling people random events from your day-to-day life. It’s about connecting a story to your ideal clients pain points and overall aspirations. So you always want to tie your story back to the message that your prospects need to hear in order to move them closer to the sale.

The third thing that can affect the impact of your story, is choosing the wrong story to communicate your message. It might be that whatever story you’re linking to your overall message is too tenuous, and so the link is unclear and it becomes confusing, or that you weren’t explicit enough when you were making the connection.

Then finally it might be that you tell a story that confuses your reader by being off brand. So if it’s not a topic that you would typically talk about in your marketing message, or if it’s something that doesn’t interest your readers, for example, I’m a bit of a history buff, but I’m not going to go around telling stories about my secret passion for Henry the VIII because people are going to think I’m a bit weird and in general my ideal client isn’t particularly interested in learning about the Tudors. In that sense, you need to be slightly careful about the subjects that you choose, you need to know your ideal client and know what topics of conversation are going to be interesting for them.

Now you know the stories that don’t work, let’s spend some time focusing on six ways that you can optimise your stories to boost your conversion.

The first thing that you need to make sure in order to tell high-converting stories, is that you know your customers inside out and that’s because you only want to tell stories that are relevant to your ideal clients pain points and aspirations. Every story that you tell although you’re probably sharing stories from your own perspective and about your own experiences, you’re actually telling your customers story, but you’re telling it, putting yourself as the hero. Always remember that everything that you talked about needs to connect to the desires and the fears of your ideal client. They’re not about you for the sake of being about you, there’s always a point to your story that ties back to your customers.

The second thing that you need to do to optimise your stories, is to make sure that you always have a clear objective. Often people say to me “When you’re writing a story, do you start with the story idea and then just see where it goes and see what the message ends up becoming? Or do you start at the end?” What I would say is that you always need to start with your marketing objective in mind. Know what the end of your message is going to be before you choose the story and not the other way around. You want to pick the story that meets your objective. You don’t want to start with the story and then choose an objective afterwards.

The third thing that you can do to optimise your story is to be extremely specific in all of the details that you share in your story. You want your prospect to be able to visualise themselves in your story and every detail that you share needs to be grounded in everyday life and in their reality, so they can actually see themselves experiencing those same pain points and the transformation. The fourth way to boost the impact of your stories is to be explicit. So make sure that when you’re sharing your story you clearly explain the link between your story and your prospect problems and aspirations. Don’t ever assume that your reader has understood the link you’re trying to make between your story and your marketing message. Be as explicit as possible and literally spell it out so that a caveman could understand the point you’re trying to make, because if there’s one thing that’s guaranteed to stop your reader from taking action, it’s being confusing and being unclear.

That ties into the next point, which is that you should always have just one key message in your story. Your story should have just one objective, one message and one thread. Don’t try and write some kind of epic novel with all different paths leading off in all different directions. That’s not what we’re trying to do here. We’re trying to convey one very clear, very specific message without going off on any kind of confusing tangents.

Then finally, make sure at the end of your story you include a clear call to action. The worst thing you could do if you’ve written a really good story with a great message is to leave your reader hanging. Don’t ever get to the end of your story and leave your reader thinking “Well, that was a great story. Now what?” You’ve got to tell them exactly what to do at the end of your story, whether that’s read my blog, hit reply and tell me what you think, buy my product now. Always give your reader a next step to keep the relationship moving forward.

If you enjoyed those tips, make sure you check out my blog where you can find more videos with hints and tips on how to improve your storytelling and your marketing emails over at www.wordistry.co.uk/blog

Close Menu